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Advanced SAS Interview Questions You\'ll Most Likely Be Asked
Advanced SAS Interview Questions You'll Most Likely Be Asked

ISBN: 9781476056098

Price:   $19.95

Quantity :        
Book Description:

Advanced SAS Interview Questions You'll Most Likely Be Asked is a perfect companion to stand ahead above the rest in today’s competitive job market. Rather than going through comprehensive, textbook-sized reference guides, this book includes only the information required immediately for job search to build an IT career. This book puts the interviewee in the driver's seat and helps them steer their way to impress the interviewer. 

 

Table of Contents
1. PROC SQL
2. Horizontal Joins
3. Vertical Joins
4. Creating and Managing Tables
5. Creating and Managing Indexes
6. Creating and Managing Views
7. Processing using PROC SQL
8. Macro Variables
9. Macro Programs
10. HR Questions
11. INDEX
 
 

Includes: 

a) 200 Advanced SAS Interview Questions, Answers and Proven Strategies for getting hired as an IT professional 
b) Dozens of examples to respond to interview questions 
c) 51 HR Questions with Answers and Proven strategies to give specific, impressive, answers that help nail the interviews 
d) 2 Aptitude Tests download available on www.vibrantpublishers.com

 

Sample from the book

(Below Questions and Answers are randomly taken from different pages of the book)
 
159: Explain the SYMBOLGEN option.
Answer: 
SYMBOLGEN is an option which is used to specify that the log messages about a macro variable reference are displayed. When this option SYMBOLGEN is turned ON, SAS displays a message about each of the macro variable reference. This log message contains the macro variable name and value.
E.g.: In the following program the option SYMBOLGEN is turned ON using OPTIONS statement. As a result the SAS log will have messages which indicate the value of referenced macro variable. In the absence of SYMBOLGEN option, i.e. when NOSYMBOLGEN is specified, it is not possible to see or know the value of the macro variable which the compiler receives. 
options symbolgen;
% let author= Charles;
title “work of &author”;
data exam.set2;
set exam.set1;
where writer = “&author”;
run;
proc print data = exam.set2;
run;
 
160: Explain the %PUT statement.
Answer: 
% PUT statement is used to write your own messages to SAS log. It can be used to verify the value of macro variables. %PUT statement writes only to SAS log and does not require quotation marks around the text. It can also be used inside or outside the macro definition.
E.g.: When the below statement is submitted the following message is displayed in the SAS log ‘The value of the macro variable author is : XXX’, XXX being the value of the macro variable.
%put The value of the macro variable author is : &author;
 
161: Which are the optional arguments used along with %PUT statement?
Answer: 
The optional arguments used along with %PUT statement are _ALL_, _AUTOMATIC_ and _USER_. 
_ALL_ when used along with %PUT statement displays the values of all the macro variables.
_AUTOMATIC_ when used along with %PUT statement displays the values of all the automatic macro variables like SYSDATE, SYSDAY, SYSTIME etc.
_USER_ when used along with %PUT statement displays the values of all the user defined macro variables.
 
162: What is the significance of using the %STR function?
Answer: 
%STR function is a macro quoting function which is used to hide the normal meaning of special tokens and other comparison and logical operators so that they appear as constant text. This enables macro triggers to work properly and also preserves the leading and trailing blanks of an argument.
E.g.: Suppose you wish to create a macro variable program and wish to assign the value of ‘data exam.set1; set exam.set2; run;’. 
When the value is assigned to the macro variable, the semicolon present after the data statement may cause SAS to assume that the value of the macro variable program ends after the data statement. So the macro variable program has a value equal to data exam.set1. 
% let program= data exam.set1; set exam.set2; run;
 
In order to avoid the above problem %STR function is used so that the semicolon present in the value is hid and it is interpreted as normal text.
% let program= %str (data exam.set1; set exam.set2; run;);
 
When the above line is submitted the macro variable program will have a value equal to ‘data exam.set1; set exam.set2; run;’.
 
163: Which function can mask the macro triggers along with capabilities to hide the special tokens?
Answer: 
%NRSTR function is a macro quoting function which is used to hide the normal meaning of special tokens and other comparison and logical operators so that they appear as constant text as well as to mask the macro triggers ( %, &).
E.g.: Suppose you wish to create a macro variable author and wish to assign the value of ‘Tom&Harry’. 
When the value is assigned to the macro variable, the ampersand present after the initial may cause SAS to interpret it as a macro trigger and an error message may be issued. 
% let author = Tom&Harry;
 
In order to avoid the above problem %NRSTR function is used so that the ampersand present in the value is hid and it is interpreted as normal text.
% let author= %nrstr (Tom&Harry);
 
When the above line is submitted the macro variable author will have a value equal to ‘Tom&Harry’.
 
164: Explain the significance of %BQUOTE function.
Answer: 
%BQUOTE function is also a macro quoting function which is used to mask the special characters and mnemonic operators. This %BQUOTE function performs during execution. This function also enables macro triggers to function normally and preserves the leading and trailing blanks in the argument.
E.g.: Suppose you wish to create a macro variable program and wish to assign the value of ‘student’s report’ to it. 
When the value is assigned to the macro variable, the apostrophe present in the statement may cause an error. 
% let program= student’s report;
 
In order to avoid the above problem %BQUOTE function is used so that the apostrophe present in the value is hid and it is interpreted as normal text.
% let program= %bquote(student’s report);
 
When the above line is submitted the macro variable program will have a value equal to ‘student’s report’.
 
165: Which function is used for changing the case of macro variables?
Answer: 
%UPCASE function is used for changing the case of macro variables from lower case to uppercase before substituting the value in the program.
E.g.: In the following program %UPCASE function is used to change the case of the macro variable author from lower case to upper case. 
options symbolgen;
% let author= Charles;
title “work of &author”;
data exam.set2;
set exam.set1;
where writer = %upcase(“&author”);
run;
 

 

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