GRE Analytical Writing:Solutions to the Real Essay Topics- Book1

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The material in this book is intended to help you prepare for the Analytical Writing section of the revised GRE test. During the test, you will be asked to respond in writing to two different types of prompts. One, Analyze an Issue, requires you to follow specific directions as you take a position on a statement, claim, or recommendation. The other, Analyze an Argument, requires you to follow specific instructions as you determine the strengths and/or weaknesses presented in an argument. Since you will have limited time to develop your responses, some preparation for the test will be helpful. The Analytical Writing Measure is just one part of the GRE, but, combined with your scores on the other parts of the test, helps to predict your ability to be successful in graduate school.
 
This book contains thirty sample Analyze an Issue essays and thirty sample Analyze an Argument essays along with the rubrics, prompts and tips to use when writing your own essays. The prewriting activities demonstrate how the writer selected a point of view and created evidence to use in developing the responses. You should notice a variety of approaches, from using first-person point of view to employing historical and literary references. These are just suggestions. Your own experience, reading, and course work may lead you to take different approaches. Keep in mind the specific directions, the rubric and your own experience in writing at the college level.
 
Table of contents
Introduction to the Analytical Writing Measure
Analyze an Issue Task
Scoring Guide
Solved Issue Tasks with Strategies
General Strategies 
Issue Task 1 – Progress requires discussion
Issue Task 2 – Dissuade students unlikely to succeed
Issue Task 3 – Governments to not fund scientific research
Issue Task 4 – Children with special talents 
Issue Task 5 – Identification with social group
Issue Task 6 – Same national curriculum
Issue Task 7 – Funding of arts
Issue Task 8 – Effective political leaders
Issue Task 9 – Best way to teach
Issue Task 10 – Teachers' salaries
Issue Task 11 – Choice of field of sudy
Issue Task 12 – Rapid pace of life
Issue Task 13 – Take variety of courses
Issue Task 14 – Means taken to attain a goal
Issue Task 15 – To become well – rounded individuals
Issue Task 16 – Politicians should pursue
Issue Task 17 – Undertake risky action
Issue Task 18 – Leaders created by demands
Issue Task 19 – Contemporary culture
Issue Task 20 – Parents should volunteer time
Issue Task 21 – Studying in a foreign country
Issue Task 22 – People's behavior
Issue Task 23 – Innovations distract from learning
Issue Task 24 – Passionate interest
Issue Task 25 – Ethical and moral standards
Issue Task 26 – Critical judgement of work
Issue Task 27 – Indicator of a great nation
Issue Task 28 – Modern development
Issue Task 29 – Make important decisions
Issue Task 30 – Character of a society
Analyze an Argument Task
Scoring Guide
Solved Argument Tasks with Strategies
General Strategies
Argument Task 1 – Clearview
Argument Task 2 – Consuming salicylates (prediction)
Argument Task 3 – Jazz music club
Argument Task 4 – West Egg Town Council
Argument Task 5 – Health magazine in Corpora
Argument Task 6 – Adams Realty
Argument Task 7 – Arctic deer
Argument Task 8 – Monarch Books
Argument Task 9 – Nature's Way
Argument Task 10 – Omega university
Argument Task 11 – Maple County
Argument Task 12 – WWAC radio station
Argument Task 13 – Television station
Argument Task 14 – Dr. Karp
Argument Task 15 – Groveton College
Argument Task 16 – Electric power company
Argument Task 17 – Climpson Industries
Argument Task 18 – Movies Galore
Argument Task 19 – Blue Highway (evidence)
Argument Task 20 – Food storage warehouse
Argument Task 21 – Calatrava
Argument Task 22 – Parson City
Argument Task 23 – Quiot Manufacturing
Argument Task 24 – West Meria
Argument Task 25 – Transopolis
Argument Task 26 – Sartorian
Argument Task 27 – Bay City
Argument Task 28 – Osteoporosis
Argument Task 29 – Crust Copper Company
Argument Task 30 – Humana University
 
Includes:
a) 60 Solved Issue and Argument topics with strategies to be used as benchmark
b) Expert Strategies and simplified methods to produce focused responses
c) Scoring Guides for Issue and Argument tasks as per the GRE Guidelines
 
Bisac
STU016000   -  Study Aids – GRE
STU026000   - study aids – Guides
STU015000   - study aids – Graduate school guides
 
Introduction to the Analytical Writing Measure
The Analytical Writing Measure is intended to assess your ability to think critically and write effectively about a topic while following specific directions. You will not need any specific content knowledge to complete either in this portion of the test. The purpose of both writing pieces is to determine your readiness to perform appropriately at the graduate level. 
During this portion of the test, you will complete two writing tasks: Analyze an Issue and Analyze an Argument. For each portion, you will have 30 minutes to read the prompt and directions and to plan and execute your response. 
The two tasks are opposite in their nature. During the Analyze an Issue task, you will write persuasively as you express your point of view on the selected topic, which may be in the form of an opinion, a recommendation, a claim and reason, or the presentation of two points of view. It is important to read the directions carefully to insure that your response is addressing the prompt correctly and to enable you to receive the highest score. 
During the Analyze an Argument task, you will evaluate an argument to determine the strength of the facts and assumptions that it presents. You may be asked to evaluate the evidence in order to determine if the assumptions are correct, formulate questions that will need to be answered before determining if the assumptions are correct, what further evidence is necessary before the argument can be declared correct, or what steps should be completed before accepting a recommended course of action. As in the Analyze an Issue task, in the Analyze an Argument task, reading and following the directions carefully is the best way to insure that you receive a high score for your efforts. 
 
Analyze an Issue Task
As you complete this task, you will have an opportunity to express your point of view on an issue. Because it is essentially your opinion, there is no “correct” answer. You must, however, support your point of view with sufficient evidence to show the strength of your argument. You may agree completely with the statement about the issue, partially agree with it, or completely disagree with it. Be certain to stay on topic and follow the directions carefully.
For example, you might be presented with a statement similar to the following: It is always best to look before you leap. You should understand this statement to mean that you should consider the consequences before taking any action. The directions may instruct you to write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement and explain your reasoning for the position you take. If you agree with the statement, you should recall examples from your reading, your studies, or your own experience that support your position. Think about Holden Caulfield’s actions in The Catcher in the Rye. His impulsive decision to spend some time alone in New York City before going home after his expulsion from Pencey Prep had unsatisfactory consequences.  You may have taken some action in your own life that you regretted afterwards. On the other hand, you may disagree with the statement. Early explorers like Christopher Columbus had little idea about what they would find as they set out in their relatively small sailing vessels. If they had thought only about the dangers of their ventures, the new world would have been discovered much later. You can also take a qualified approach by agreeing with the statement to some extent. Remember, your approach is not important. The GRE essay readers are trained to evaluate a wide variety of approaches to the issue and evaluate them on their strengths and weaknesses and not on the opinion expressed. 
The following is a comprehensive list of the instructions that will accompany the statements in the Analyze an Issue task.
a) Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement and explain your reasoning for the position you take. In developing and supporting your position, you should consider ways in which the statement might or might not hold true and explain how these considerations shape your position.
b) Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the recommendation and explain your reasoning for the position you take. In developing and supporting your position, describe specific circumstances in which adopting the recommendation would or would not be advantageous and explain how these examples shape your position.
c) Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the claim. In developing and supporting your position, be sure to address the most compelling reasons and/or examples that could be used to challenge your position.
d) Write a response in which you discuss which view more closely aligns with your own position and explain your reasoning for the position you take. In developing and supporting your position, you should address both of the views presented.
e) Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the claim and the reasons on which that claim is based.
f) Write a response in which you discuss your views on the policy and explain your reasoning for the position you take. In developing and supporting your position, you should consider the possible consequences of implementing the policy and explain how these consequences shape your position.
g) You may have had some experience with writing persuasively in high school or college, but you do not need to worry about specific rhetorical devices in order to complete this task and receive a high score. It is important to stay on topic, present your argument in a coherent and cohesive manner, and to recognize other points of view in order to strengthen your own. You should also make every attempt to use correct grammar, mechanics, and a variety of sentence structures to improve the fluency of your essay. The scoring guide that follows is reprinted from the Practice Book for the GRE Revised General Test, developed by Educational Testing Service. 
 
Analyze an Argument Task
In the Analyze an Argument task, you will take an approach that differs from that in the Analyze an Issue task. You will not be asked to develop and defend a point of view. You will be asked to analyze an argument and the evidence and assumptions on which it is based. You will be presented by a brief passage that makes an argument either for taking some course of action, following a recommendation, or supporting a prediction. You should read the passage carefully to identify either stated or unstated assumptions or to determine the line of reasoning used by the author of the passage. The directions will instruct you to approach your analysis in any of several ways. You may be asked to state what additional evidence is needed to make the argument sound, what questions will need to be answered before accepting a recommendation, or whether a prediction based on the argument is reasonable. 
As in the Analyze an Issue task, there is no “right” answer or approach. It is important to stay on topic, use sound reasoning and examples in your response, and strive to develop a coherent, cohesive, and fluent response. Remember that analysis is the act of breaking something down into its components to see how well they relate to each other. The components of the argument may include facts, statistics or other figures, and both stated and unstated assumptions. For example, the owner of Gemma’s Jewelry store may predict that, based on the past two years’ sales, the store will see an increase of 10% in next year’s sales. One of the unstated assumptions is that the demand for luxury goods will increase despite whatever else may happen to the economy. Gemma’s Jewelry doesn’t say what will account for the increase in sales. Will the store add new lines of merchandise? Will the store increase its advertising? Will the store expand in size? Is a 10% increase significant? If sales were $40,000 last year, is an additional $4,000 dollars in sales meaningful?
You will not need knowledge in any specific discipline to analyze an argument. The topics are of general interest and are accessible to anyone regardless of previous course work. The GRE essay readers will be looking for your ability to reason and organize your thoughts in a logical way. The scoring guide that follows is reprinted from the Practice Book for the GRE Revised General Test, developed by Educational Testing Service. 
 
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